Arlington Roofing

Arlington Roofing Company Shares Its Views

Founded in 1996 in the historical Arlington, MA, Ranch Roofing still spends a lot of time on the roofs of Arlington. As one of the leading Arlington roofers around town, we really learn a lot about the sites and scenes. Plus, depending on the day and area of town, we are sure to spot a historically significant building or landmark. Here is a short list of some of our favorites:

 

Regent Theater

  • First opened in 1916, the Regent Theater was built as a multi-use building consisting of retail spaces, the theater, and an 8-lane bowling alley built by the historic Mystic Bowling Alley Co. Originally focused as a vaudeville house, a type of variety show popular in the 20th century, the Regent has stayed true to its intimate origins while attracting celebrated performers from around the world. The theater has been host to acts such as beloved comedian Mickey Rooney, Rock and Roll Hall of Famer Steven Tyler of Boston megaband Aerosmith, and the big band sound of the Count Basie Orchestra which has been performing since 1935! Many other critically acclaimed acts and musicians have passed through the Regent’s doors since its inception and subsequent remodels. History buffs can read more about the theater here which also includes several historic news articles written about the theater.

 

Old Schwamb Mill

  • Another significant and celebrated historic landmark of Arlington is the Old Schwamb Mill, which is the oldest continuously operated mill site in the United States. Located on a mill site from the 1600’s, the Old Schwamb Mill site was purchased by Charles Schwamb in 1864. It was then run continuously under various generations of the Schwamb family until death and retirement forced closure of the Schwamb’s mill in 1969. In January 1970 under threat of demolition, the mill was resurrected by the Old Schwamb Mill Preservation Trust and has continued its production of stunning, hand-turned wooden oval and round frames under the tutelage of several expert craftsmen. Today, the mill is open weekly for donation-encouraged tours, with appointment only tours on Tuesday’s to watch craftsman, David Graf, use and explain the 19th century lathes. More information on the history of the mill and tours can be found here.

 

Jason Russell House

  • Built in the 1740s in the traditional colonial style often seen around New England, the Jason Russell house was a major site of the Battle of Lexington and Concord on April 19, 1775. This location is considered by most to be the first major fight of the Battle of Lexington and Concord, which was in turn the first true conflict in what would become the Revolutionary War and shape the landscape of the United States. The Jason Russell House was purchased in 1923 by the Arlington Historical Society nearly 150 years after the battle.

 

Robbins Farm Park

  • What was once the Robbins Farm and Mansion, Robbin’s Farm Park was purchased in 1942 by the city of Arlington and offers incredible views of the Boston skyline to its visitors. During this time the US Government was urging citizens to plant “Victory Gardens” to aid in the wartime food effort. The city of Arlington used this newly purchased land to house 66 Victory Gardens through the end of the war. Today Robbins Farm Park is a multi-use area consisting of: a community garden used for teaching, baseball diamond, dog park, children’s playground, soccer field, and a large green space for public use. Here you can find more about the park and its history.

Spy Pond Park

  • Nature lovers rejoice at Spy Pond Park in the heart of Arlington. Spy Pond or, Spie Pond as it was referred to as in the 17th and 18th centuries, is a 103 acre pond and corresponding park that is rich with wildlife. As Spy Pond is home to a multitude of different bird populations, it has become a popular place for local bird watchers to congregate and appreciate their beauty. Must like the rest of the town, Spy Pond is home to several historic references including tales from the Revolutionary and Civil War. Just be careful of “Lizzie” the “Spy Pond Monster”. According to a local tale, Lizzie, a Komodo Dragon, was released on Elizabeth Island and is said to now inhabit the pond.

 

For different views of Boston and its surrounding areas check out more of our Arlington roofing company’s views posts, like this one from Concord.

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